Do you know a survivor of suicide?

“Before today, I didn’t realize that there are others out there who feel exactly the way I feel.”   – Survivor from Alberta, Canada

“If telling my story can comfort another survivor, then I will continue to tell it. – Laurell Reussow, survivor

International-Survivors-of-Suicide-DaySaturday, November 23, 2013 is the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s 15th Annual International Survivors of Suicide Day.

Thousands of survivors of suicide loss gather together around the world on this day for mutual support & practical guidance on coping with grief.  Survivor conferences will be held in cities throughout the U.S. and abroad, offering speakers, workshops, and sharing sessions.

Survivors of Suicide Day- Milwaukee Event

Individuals are encouraged to experience International Survivors of Suicide Day in person. It is a rare opportunity to be able to look around a room and know that every person there inherently understands part of what you are going through. A local event, sponsored by Mental Health American and Aurora Behavioral Health Services, will be held at Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center on November 23 from 9am – 1pm. Click here for details.

Watch Online at AFSP.org

You can visit the AFSP website on Saturday, November 23 to watch our program online from 1:00–2:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time along with thousands of other survivors around the world.  Then connect with your fellow survivors of suicide loss and discuss issues brought up during the program by joining our live online chat starting at 2:30 P.M. EST on November 23rd. Karyl Chastain Beal will moderate the chat. Karyl is the long-time facilitator of the Parents of Suicide (POS) and Friends and Families of Suicide (FFOS) Internet support communities and a member of AFSP’s Survivor Council.

If you or someone you know is experiencing anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, or thoughts of suicide visit the web site for Aurora Psychiatric Hospital or contact us at 414-454-6777.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

Sleep and Insomnia

Dr. Lisa Cottrell is a clinical psychologist at the Aurora Behavioral Health Center in Wauwatosa.

Dr. Lisa Cottrell is a clinical psychologist at the Aurora Behavioral Health Center in Wauwatosa.

National Sleep Awareness Week , March 2-9, 2014., is a public education and awareness campaign to promote the importance of sleep. Dr. Lisa Cottrell Ph.D., CBSM. Licensed Psychologist, Board Certified in Behavioral Sleep Medicine, explains that there is effective treatment for insomnia.

How much sleep do we need?

Sleep need varies among individuals, but it generally changes as we age. The National Sleep Foundation suggests that school-age children (5-10 years) need 10-11 hours of sleep nightly, teens (10-17 years) need 8.5-9 hours and adults need 7-9 hours. According to data from the National Health Interview Survey, nearly 30% of adults reported an average of 6 hours or less of sleep per night in 2005-2007.

What is Insomnia?

Insomnia, which is Latin for “no sleep,” is the inability to fall asleep or remain asleep. Insomnia is also used to describe the condition of waking up not feeling restored or refreshed. Insomnia is the most common sleep problem among Americans. According to the National Center for Sleep Disorders research at the National Institutes of Health, in any given year, 30 – 40% of adults have some symptoms of insomnia and 10 – 15% of adults report that they have chronic insomnia.

What causes Insomnia?

Insomnia may be caused by a variety of reasons: illnesses or underlying medical conditions; stress, anxiety or depression; certain medications; sleep disorders or issues related to sleep hygiene.

What are the effects of Insomnia?

The lack of sleep can be harmful to living a healthy life. Insufficient sleep can cause difficulty concentrating, lower your ability to learn, and impair performance of daily tasks. Sleep deficiency has been linked to motor vehicle crashes, industrial disasters, and medical and other occupational errors. Persons experiencing sleep insufficiency are also more likely to suffer from chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, depression, and obesity, as well as from cancer, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life and productivity. When an underlying medical condition is causing insomnia, the insomnia can exacerbate the condition and health and sleep problems further deteriorate.

How is Insomnia treated?

Insomnia can be treated successfully. While there are medications available to treat difficulty falling and staying asleep, there is also an evidence-based approach to treat insomnia that does not require the use of medication.

Cognitive-behavioral treatment of insomnia (CBTI) is a short-term psychotherapy that is based on scientific knowledge about sleep. CBTI has been shown in research to be as effective as medication to treat insomnia in the short-term and more effective than medication in the long-term. However, you do not need to stop other treatment or medication while participating in CBTI.

CBTI involves meeting with a psychologist trained in the method. It is a short-term (6-10 sessions) treatment approach that includes monitoring sleep patterns, changing sleep-related behaviors, managing the sleep environment and learning strategies to cope effectively with thoughts or worries that interfere with sleep. People who engage in CBTI report high satisfaction with the method and significant improvements in sleep.

If you or someone you know is experiencing problems with sleep contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services

Dr. Lisa Cottrell Ph.D., CBSM. Licensed Psychologist, Board Certified in Behavioral Sleep Medicine is a clinical psychologist at Aurora Behavioral Health Center in Grafton, specializing in the behavioral and psychological treatment of sleep disorders. 

Aurora Offers Primary Care Physician Training on Behavioral Health

Identifying Mental Illness

  • Parents of a teenage son visit their primary care physician to find out why he is suddenly failing classes
  • A new mother sees her obstetrician because she has been sleeping all the time and has lost her appetite.
  • A man and his wife seek advice from the physician to find out why he is absent from work so frequently due to illness
  • A young woman makes a suicide attempt several days after seeing her physician for feeling lethargic and down

woman-in-crowdPeople with mental illness or addictions often seek help for physical symptoms. People with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or addictions typically are seen in primary care more than any other setting.  In a recent NAMI survey, 89 percent of families responded that they had discussed mental health concerns with their child’s primary care physician. Addiction, depression and other mental health problems can go undiagnosed  and untreated.  Primary care physicians can play a critical role in identifying a mental health or substance abuse issue and making appropriate treatment referrals.

Nearly one in 10 Americans 18 and older is depressed, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study in the Oct. 1 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. One in four adults has a diagnosable mental disorder in any given year, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Primary care providers have significant opportunities to identify behavioral health problems early and intervene in a manner that prevents further deterioration and avoids significant future costs. Screening and early intervention are priorities that may not only improve outcomes for individuals but also, over time, provide savings to the system.

In the primary care setting, physicians should look for signs of mental health problems, such as trouble sleeping and eating, experts say. In children, doctors should look for atypical behavior that begins suddenly, such as irritability or a drop in grades with a good student. Physicians should incorporate behavioral health screenings into wellness check ups for all patients, and routinely screen for depression, particularly with pregnant and perinatal women.

Mental Health America (MHA) believes that primary health care providers should be encouraged to identify signs of mental health or substance use issues at the earliest possible time. This position is also endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and (for depression) the United States Preventive Services Task Force.

Training for Primary Care Providers

Aurora Behavioral Health Services, in partnership with Kubly Foundation, is offering on-line CME modules for primary care providers on the following behavioral health related topics:

If you or someone you know would benefit from addiction treatment or mental health services, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

Can Eastern spiritual philosophies support recovery from addiction?

Spirituality has increasingly been recognized as a resource for treating addictions, ever since Alcoholics Anonymous introduced its 12-step program – with its recognition of a “higher power” – over 75 years ago. 

Join Dr. Ashok Bedi for a reading/signing/author event on Wednesday, July 17 at 7pm at Boswell Book Company, 2559 North Downer Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53211

Join Dr. Ashok Bedi for a reading/signing/author event on Wednesday, July 17 at 7pm at Boswell Book Company, 2559 North Downer Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53211.

The American Psychological Association confirms an association between spirituality and positive outcomes in substance abuse treatment. SAMSHA statesThe beneficial role that faith and spirituality play in the prevention of drug and alcohol abuse and in programs designed to treat and promote recovery from substance abuse and mental disorders has long been acknowledged.”

One study published in the October 2000 issue of Psychiatric Times showed that the measure of “importance of religion” was the best predictor in indicating lack of substance abuse.

The Residential Treatment Program at the Dewey Center of Aurora Psychiatric Hospital uses a holistic and evidence-based approach to drug and alcohol rehabilitation and recovery, including incorporating spirituality. The addictions program at Aurora Psychiatric Hospital includes group therapy provided by Dr. Ashok Bedi focusing on the benefits of Eastern spirituality philosophies in recovery.

Spirituality is part of the human experience in which we explore who we are and what our life is about. Some approaches to healing, such as mindfulness based therapies, incorporate Eastern spiritual practices, without a requirement to believe in a higher power or religion. This can be a good way to get in touch with your spirituality, without getting embroiled in ambivalence about your beliefs, or feelings of inconsistency between the therapy and your beliefs or lack of them. Eastern spiritual philosophies offer much wisdom for achieving health, happiness, and wholeness, including successful recovery from addiction.

“The goal is not to get patient feeling better for 1 month or 1 year” says Dr. Bedi. “The goal is to give them instruments that can make them feel better for the rest of their lives”.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers treatment programs that can help. For more information, call 1-877-666-7223 or visit the Aurora Psychiatric Hospital website.

Overcoming barriers: May is Mental Health Month

Mental Health America continues its tradition of celebrating “May is Mental Health Month,” which began in 1949 to raise awareness of mental health conditions and mental wellness for all.
Mental health month 2014 Mind Your Health
Mental illnesses are medical illnesses. One in four adults experiences a mental health problem in any given year. One in 17 lives with serious, chronic illness.

On average, people living with serious mental illness live 25 years less than the rest of the population. One reason is that less than one-third of adults and less than one-half of children with a diagnosed illness receive treatment.

The U.S. Surgeon General has reported that stigma is a major barrier to people seeking help when they need it. That’s why awareness is so important. We want people to understand mental illness and join a dialogue in our community. The more people know, the better they can help themselves or help their loved ones get the help and support they need.

When mental health care isn’t available in a community, the results often are lost jobs and careers, broken families, more homelessness, more welfare and much more expensive costs for hospital emergency rooms, nursing homes, schools, police and even courts, jails and prisons.

To access free screenings for depression, anxiety and other mental health concerns visit our screening center

If you or someone you know would benefit from addiction treatment or mental health services, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

mental health month 2013

April is Alcohol Awareness Month

NCADD (National Council on Alcoholism and  Drug Dependence) has sponsored Alcohol Awareness Month since 1987. It is an opportunity to raise awareness of alcohol abuse and encourage people to make healthy, safe choices.

ncadd%20alcohol%20awareness%20month%202013-%20logoDrinking too much alcohol can lead to health problems, including alcohol poisoning, hangovers, and an increased risk of heart disease. If you are drinking too much, you can improve your health by cutting back or quitting. Keep track of how much you drink, avoid places where overdrinking occurs, and find new ways to deal with stress. If you are concerned about someone else’s drinking, offer to help.

If you or someone you know is struggling with a drinking problem, Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers treatment programs that can help.

If you or someone you know is battling addiction, contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible

April 10 is National Alcohol Screening Day. How do you score?

ncadd%20alcohol%20awareness%20month%202013-%20logoNational Alcohol Screening Day is an outreach, education, and screening program that raises awareness about alcohol misuse and refers individuals with alcohol problems for further treatment.

Thousands of colleges, community-based organizations, and military installations provide the program to the public each year.

What are the warning signs?

If you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, you may have a problem with alcohol:

  • Do you drink alone when you feel angry or sad?
  • Does your drinking ever make you late for work?
  • Does your drinking worry your family?
  • Do you ever drink after telling yourself you won’t?
  • Do you ever forget what you did while drinking?
  • Do you get headaches or have a hangover after drinking?

If you or someone you know is struggling with a drinking problem, Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers treatment programs that can help.

If you or someone you know is battling addiction, contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

 

Celebrating our caregivers: March is Social Worker Month

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) recognizes March as Social Worker Month. This year’s theme, “Weaving Threads of Resilience and Advocacy,” emphasizes the value of using personal strengths and self-advocacy to manage serious life challenges.

Social work is currently one of the fastest growing professions in the United States;

social work month 2013They are employed in many different organizations and industries, including private and public agencies, hospices, hospitals, and health care organizations, schools and universities, businesses and foundations, military branches and veterans centers, as well as national and local public elected offices.

There are currently more than 650,000 professionally trained social workers in the United States, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts job growth to 800,000 by the year 2020.

Social workers help millions of people function better in their environments. The primary mission of Social Work is to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic needs of all people, especially the most vulnerable. As therapists, social workers accomplish this mission in many ways:

  • Social Workers help patients develop treatment plans that use their strengths, resilience, and self-advocacy to navigate life challenges.
  • Social Workers help patients function better in their environments, improve their relationships with others, and solve personal and family problems through a wide range of interventions.
  • Social Workers assist patients in every stage of life, from all communities, through individual, group and family therapy.
Pete Carlson is the president of Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

Pete Carlson is the president of Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

“ABHS utilizes social workers at all levels of care. They are invaluable in delivering effective, quality behavioral health and substance abuse treatment.” says Pete Carlson, President of Aurora Behavioral Health Services. “Social workers play a vital role in our inpatient, residential, partial hospital, intensive outpatient and outpatient treatment programs. I extend a warm and sincere “Thank You” to all our clinical social workers.”

For a list of social workers at Aurora Behavioral Health Services, or to search for a social worker visit our web site.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

 

Are you a “heavy drinker?”

A recent story published by the Milwaukee Journal/Sentinel indicates Wisconsin was the state with the nation’s highest percentage of heavy drinkers — well above the U.S. median of 6.6%.

Aurora offers a full continuum of substance abuse treatment and related services for children, youth, adults and families.

Aurora offers a full continuum of substance abuse treatment and related services for children, youth, adults and families.

Wisconsin ranked number one, with 9.8% of residents considered heavy drinkers. Just what is a “heavy drinker”?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, men having more than 14 drinks per week, and women having more than 7 drinks per week fall into the heavy drinking category.

Binge drinkers are those who have more than 5 drinks in a day for men, or 4 drinks in a day for women.

“Heavy or binge alcohol consumption can negatively affect an individual’s health in many ways” according to David Smith, MD, vice president of Patient Experience and Care Management at Aurora Health Care.

“The impact on families, communities, and workplace are well known. The brain, nervous system, heart, liver, stomach, gastrointestinal tract, and pancreas can all be damaged by alcoholism. In addition, accidents and injuries related to alcohol use are much higher. We are placing a lot of emphasis on encouraging our caregivers to live healthy lifestyles, and limiting alcohol consumption is key to good health”

For more information on the impact of heavy alcohol consumption, visit these resources.

If you or someone you know is battling addiction, contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

drinking

Would you recognize the signs of an eating disorder?

Whether you’re a professional caregiver, a friend, or a family member, you could be the first person to recognize and offer assistance regarding a patient’s eating and weight concerns. Identifying the problem early is important.  Early detection and treatment improves the prognosis.

PosterFlyerSCOFF is a screening tool developed to identify patients who may be experiencing an eating disorder.

The SCOFF questionnaire is effective as a screening instrument because it is simple, memorable, easily applied and scored.

One point is assigned for every “yes”; a score greater than two (≥2) indicates a possible case of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa.

The SCOFF questions

  • Do you make yourself Sick because you feel uncomfortably full?
  • Do you worry that you have lost Control over how much you eat?
  • Have you recently lost more than One stone (14 lb) in a 3-month period?
  • Do you believe yourself to be Fat when others say you are too thin?
  • Would you say that Food dominates your life?

Read more information about What every Primary Care Physician should know about eating disorders.

NEDAwareness Week is February 24-March 2, 2013. This is the largest education and outreach effort on eating disorders in the United States.The aim of NEDAwareness Week is to increase awareness and education about eating disorders and body image issues for effective recognition, early intervention and direction to care.

If you or someone you know may be struggling with an eating disorder, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services. Access an Eating Disorders Screening Tool, or learn about the Eating Disorder Program at Aurora Psychiatric Hospital.

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