Do you know a survivor of suicide?

“Before today, I didn’t realize that there are others out there who feel exactly the way I feel.”   – Survivor from Alberta, Canada

“If telling my story can comfort another survivor, then I will continue to tell it. – Laurell Reussow, survivor

International-Survivors-of-Suicide-DaySaturday, November 23, 2013 is the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s 15th Annual International Survivors of Suicide Day.

Thousands of survivors of suicide loss gather together around the world on this day for mutual support & practical guidance on coping with grief.  Survivor conferences will be held in cities throughout the U.S. and abroad, offering speakers, workshops, and sharing sessions.

Survivors of Suicide Day- Milwaukee Event

Individuals are encouraged to experience International Survivors of Suicide Day in person. It is a rare opportunity to be able to look around a room and know that every person there inherently understands part of what you are going through. A local event, sponsored by Mental Health American and Aurora Behavioral Health Services, will be held at Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center on November 23 from 9am – 1pm. Click here for details.

Watch Online at AFSP.org

You can visit the AFSP website on Saturday, November 23 to watch our program online from 1:00–2:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time along with thousands of other survivors around the world.  Then connect with your fellow survivors of suicide loss and discuss issues brought up during the program by joining our live online chat starting at 2:30 P.M. EST on November 23rd. Karyl Chastain Beal will moderate the chat. Karyl is the long-time facilitator of the Parents of Suicide (POS) and Friends and Families of Suicide (FFOS) Internet support communities and a member of AFSP’s Survivor Council.

If you or someone you know is experiencing anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, or thoughts of suicide visit the web site for Aurora Psychiatric Hospital or contact us at 414-454-6777.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

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Aurora Offers Primary Care Physician Training on Behavioral Health

Identifying Mental Illness

  • Parents of a teenage son visit their primary care physician to find out why he is suddenly failing classes
  • A new mother sees her obstetrician because she has been sleeping all the time and has lost her appetite.
  • A man and his wife seek advice from the physician to find out why he is absent from work so frequently due to illness
  • A young woman makes a suicide attempt several days after seeing her physician for feeling lethargic and down

woman-in-crowdPeople with mental illness or addictions often seek help for physical symptoms. People with depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or addictions typically are seen in primary care more than any other setting.  In a recent NAMI survey, 89 percent of families responded that they had discussed mental health concerns with their child’s primary care physician. Addiction, depression and other mental health problems can go undiagnosed  and untreated.  Primary care physicians can play a critical role in identifying a mental health or substance abuse issue and making appropriate treatment referrals.

Nearly one in 10 Americans 18 and older is depressed, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study in the Oct. 1 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. One in four adults has a diagnosable mental disorder in any given year, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Primary care providers have significant opportunities to identify behavioral health problems early and intervene in a manner that prevents further deterioration and avoids significant future costs. Screening and early intervention are priorities that may not only improve outcomes for individuals but also, over time, provide savings to the system.

In the primary care setting, physicians should look for signs of mental health problems, such as trouble sleeping and eating, experts say. In children, doctors should look for atypical behavior that begins suddenly, such as irritability or a drop in grades with a good student. Physicians should incorporate behavioral health screenings into wellness check ups for all patients, and routinely screen for depression, particularly with pregnant and perinatal women.

Mental Health America (MHA) believes that primary health care providers should be encouraged to identify signs of mental health or substance use issues at the earliest possible time. This position is also endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and (for depression) the United States Preventive Services Task Force.

Training for Primary Care Providers

Aurora Behavioral Health Services, in partnership with Kubly Foundation, is offering on-line CME modules for primary care providers on the following behavioral health related topics:

If you or someone you know would benefit from addiction treatment or mental health services, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

How do you create and maintain structure for children?

Eight helpful hints for parents

Bucaro, Diane 02

Diane Bucaro, LCSW, is a therapist at Aurora Behavioral Health Center in Wauwatosa

Have you ever had a parent tell you that every morning they are 15 minutes late to work? Or that their child is  glued to their favorite cartoon and they need to do their homework, chores, and get ready for bed in the next 30 minutes?

Here are some general tips/guidelines I use with parents.

1. Most kids respond well to a routine. Whenever possible have consistent bed times, wake up times, and meal times. (Per Super Nanny 4:30-5:30pm is the best dinner time for children younger than age 5. Obviously, this will depend on work schedules, do the best you can given your family’s needs).

2. Sleep is essential. Children between the ages of three and six need 10 to 12 hours of sleep overall. By age four or five, children typically have outgrown a nap. Children ages seven to twelve need 10 to 11 hours of sleep a night, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

3. Have the parent do their best to offer nutritious foods. Parents can have a pad of paper in the kitchen to jot down meal ideas or if you are running low on an item. Preparing meals ahead of time to heat up when you get home, and researching crockpot recipes can be very helpful for busy parents. It is also wonderful to have at least 3 “go to meals” — something that can be made quickly and easily at home (pasta, sandwiches) that is not the drive thru at the nearest fast food chain. When it comes to new foods and specifically vegetables it is also helpful to remember that it may take several trials of a food before a child may say they “like it”.

4. Have house rules and established consequences for “broken rules”. If parents have established consequences they are less likely to become “heavy handed” or ignore them and regret this later. However, sometimes ignoring is an appropriate strategy. An example of appropriate ignoring maybe when the child burps loudly at the table and is looking directly at the parent for a reaction. In situations like that, any reaction plays into the child’s hands.

AUR_108443959 (1)When applicable, use positive reinforcement such as “good job, I’m so proud of you”. Make a behavioral chart or plan for things that may be more difficult for that child. The parent can develop a token system for a specific time frame of positive behavior.

Dr. Matthew A. Johnson, has developed a system called “Positive Parenting with a Plan” which has specific guidelines to use positive and negative reinforcements for behavior.  He has written a book for parents if they need more help to guide behavior for children ages 5 and up. Some kids respond well to time outs or having treasured objects taken away for a short period of time (1-7 days, the younger the child the shorter the time).

5. Organization: a place for everything. This can be essential to get out the door on time. Have a place for coats, shoes, backpacks and papers. Often we take off items off near the outside door or set down bags, unload items. This area can soon be cluttered and in disarray, especially if there are multiple children in the home. Have a system where kids stuff hats and mittens in their coat sleeves as soon as they take them off. Another option is to set out a basket for hats and mittens. Have a system for kids’ school papers after they have completed them. Have items ready the night before school/work.

6. Have adults be positive role-models by taking good care of themselves and overall showing displays of good citizen. Example, you find an iPhone at the library and you turn it into lost and found.

7. If possible, have a support network of relatives and friends that are positive or may understand what it is like to be raising children or may even be able to give you a break from time to time.

8. Screen time, less is more. If you think about it the more time in front of a screen is typically the less time for exercise, academics, creativity and social interaction. Some families decide to have regular TV times, computer or game times as a reward. I often recommend for the television to be off when getting ready for school in the morning, as well as during meal-times and homework times.

If a parent is really struggling with challenging behaviors or there is a concern that the child is often sad, angry, aggressive, inconsolable or having some other social/emotional distress it can be very helpful to have the child/family assessed for therapy services.

For more information, contact Aurora Psychiatric Hospital at 1-877-666-7223 or visit the Aurora Psychiatric Hospital website.

 

 

Overcoming barriers: May is Mental Health Month

Mental Health America continues its tradition of celebrating “May is Mental Health Month,” which began in 1949 to raise awareness of mental health conditions and mental wellness for all.
Mental health month 2014 Mind Your Health
Mental illnesses are medical illnesses. One in four adults experiences a mental health problem in any given year. One in 17 lives with serious, chronic illness.

On average, people living with serious mental illness live 25 years less than the rest of the population. One reason is that less than one-third of adults and less than one-half of children with a diagnosed illness receive treatment.

The U.S. Surgeon General has reported that stigma is a major barrier to people seeking help when they need it. That’s why awareness is so important. We want people to understand mental illness and join a dialogue in our community. The more people know, the better they can help themselves or help their loved ones get the help and support they need.

When mental health care isn’t available in a community, the results often are lost jobs and careers, broken families, more homelessness, more welfare and much more expensive costs for hospital emergency rooms, nursing homes, schools, police and even courts, jails and prisons.

To access free screenings for depression, anxiety and other mental health concerns visit our screening center

If you or someone you know would benefit from addiction treatment or mental health services, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services.

mental health month 2013

Do you always need to be hospitalized for mental health care?

Partial Hospitalization Program offers alternative to inpatient mental health care

For people who do not need to be hospitalized for behavioral health issues like anxiety, depression, bipolar or post traumatic stress disorder, but who have serious symptoms that are impacting their ability to cope with a daily routine, we offer Partial Hospitalization.

Partial Hospitalization is a great alternative to inpatient care, with a more flexible schedule, and is also more cost-effective. Yet, many people are still unaware that this program exists. It’s a fairly new concept in mental health care, having become available within the last 10-15 years.

mother daughters kids children family outdoors summer heroPartial Hospitalization provides clinically equivalent mental healthcare at a much lower cost than inpatient treatment. According to the Association for Ambulatory Behavioral Healthcare, direct cost savings over inpatient benefits are usually 40 to 60 percent — and more than 60 percent in some instances.

There are additional benefits because an employee involved in partial hospitalization treatment may be able to work on at least a limited basis, thus maintaining productivity.

Partial hospitalization dates back to the 1960s, when a small group of clinicians believed that individuals with acute mental illness would have a better chance of recovery and healthy functioning if they were allowed to pursue their treatment in the same communities where they worked, went to school, or maintained their family relationships.

“Our program provides the resources available to an inpatient without being completely isolated from your life” explains Marlyene Pfeiffer, LCSW, CSAC, and program psychotherapist at Aurora Psychiatric Hospital. “It’s an alternative to inpatient care, or a nice transition toward home for those ready to be discharged from the hospital.”

Partial Hospital programs help individuals develop and strengthen coping and healthy living skills – from healthy eating and regular exercise, to better sleep habits. Patients come in during the day and go home to their families in the evening. This allows them to practice the new skills they’ve learned, while also promoting their new-found confidence and independence.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers several Partial Hospitalization Programs.

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

How do you perceive people with psychiatric issues?

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What if you were to ask a group of friends or colleagues “How many of you have ever broken a bone?”

I’m sure they would not have thought twice about raising their hands if that were the case. Then I would have asked “How many of you have ever been diagnosed and treated for some form of mental or emotional disturbance?” I suspect none would have raised their hands, and there would have been an awkward silence.

Perhaps the stigma which continues to linger in our modern age is because the field of psychiatry is relatively young, compared to other sciences. Or perhaps it is because there tends to be an unrealistic expectation that anyone who is “competent” should not incur such types of problems.

The truth of the matter is: man, by his very nature, is imperfect, and mental health conditions can be inherited, just like so many other illnesses. Mental health conditions can also develop easily enough based on our ever-changing sets of life circumstances. Chemical imbalances stemming from a variety of bodily changes, such as hormonal, or thyroid, or a wide variety of other factors, can also bring on a range of psychiatric symptoms. All of these can happen to any of us at any time, whether we like it or not.

Why is it we don’t hesitate to contact our doctor when we have a physical problem, but hesitate to contact them when the problem is of an emotional nature? This is where the stigma comes in; that fear of what others might think of us. And that fear is based on a sense of shame, as if for some reason we are automatically buying into the negative stereotype of whatever label our symptoms might suggest.

As individuals we are far more than one or two labels might suggest. If we suffer from symptoms of anxiety or depression or a myriad of other potential psychiatric symptoms, does that make up the whole of who we are? Does that mean we are to automatically assume feelings of shame, inadequacy, or worse yet, label ourselves as a victim? If we break a leg do we not place our focus on the steps we need to take to heal, as opposed to just laying there as if nothing can be done?

Some progress has been made regarding the unfortunate stigma which has been placed on mental health or emotional problems, but we still have a long way to go. Every day we see the kinds of shortcomings each of us too often display, whether they can be labeled as a legitimate psychiatric condition or not.

The fact is, we have all exhibited unhealthy behaviors toward each other, and the challenge to improve our condition is always by degrees. We live in a world with a million shades of gray, and it does none of us any good to think strictly in polarized terms, as if everything should be black or white, all or nothing. We would all be wise to daily practice a greater degree of compassion to those in the world around us.

For more about mental health treatment, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

How can art therapy be used to treat eating disorder?

Art therapy is part of the holistic treatment approach applied to treat eating disorders at Aurora Psychiatric Hospital. Patients can develop self-awareness, adopt better coping mechanisms, improve cognitive functions, and find pleasure in art making.

The purpose of art therapy is fundamentally on healing.  Art therapy helps patients creatively express emotions they may be having difficulty expressing verbally.

It is vital that patients express their emotions. Many times abusive or deadly behaviors are used to numb the pain of not speaking up and out. Obsessions with food and weight are often attempts to cope with unresolved emotional issues such as depression, rage, powerlessness, and loss.

Art therapy is a special tool that can help provide access to those hidden feelings in a safe and non-threatening way. Patients in the Eating Disorder Program at Aurora Psychiatric Hospital participate in both guided art and open art studios in an effort to strengthen and apply their inner resources towards recovery. Art therapy techniques are used to explore the issues that have led to compulsive eating, binging, purging, starving, over-exercising, laxative abuse, etc. Art Therapy is offered as a creative source and an outlet for patients to overcome blocked feelings. Emphasis is on discovering new ways to nurture oneself.

Art therapy is often intimidating to people. Many patients think they’re not artists or they can’t draw or they’re not creative. But art therapy is about the creative process, not the creative product. Patients connect with their inner experiences and find a way to express something that they may not be able to do easily with words. That’s one reason art therapy is a natural fit for eating disorders. It takes away the shame and helps people feel empowered.

A range of materials and mediums can be used, including pencils, watercolors, clay, collages and more. If someone is feeling anxious, overwhelmed, or out of control they might prefer markers or pencils, which help foster a sense of control. Someone who is feeling “stuck” or needing to break out might try a more fluid media, like watercolor paint. And someone who doesn’t want to draw at all can use collage, for example.

Looking at the visual representation of a particular issue provides helpful understanding of the emotions involved. So a person can examine how they feel and behave currently vs. how they want to feel or behave and explore what’s keeping them from functioning the way they want to in a situation or relationship. It’s a skill that can continue to be used at home after treatment as well. Art can be used as a positive coping skill to incorporate into a long term recovery plan.

If you or someone you know is struggling with an eating disorder contact Aurora Psychiatric Hospital Eating Disorders Program

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

Support all those effected by suicide on International Survivors of Suicide Day

Every 40 seconds someone in the world dies by suicide. Every 41 seconds someone is left to make sense of it.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention sponsors International Survivors of Suicide Day, an annual event for fellow survivors to come together for support, healing, information and empowerment. On November 17 this year, survivor conferences will be held in cities throughout the U.S. and abroad, offering speakers, workshops, and sharing sessions.

In addition to their local programming, all of the conference sites watch a 90-minute AFSP broadcast that includes “experienced” survivors and mental health professionals addressing the questions that so many survivors face: Why did this happen? How do I cope? Where can I find support? Since many survivors also find it helpful to understand something about the science of suicide prevention and bereavement, the program also includes a brief presentation of what scientific research has revealed about the psychiatric illnesses associated with suicide.

Survivors of Suicide Day- Milwaukee Event: A local event, sponsored by Mental Health American and Aurora Behavioral Health Services, will be held at Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center. Click here for details.

If you or someone you know is experiencing anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, or thoughts of suicide visit the web site for Aurora Psychiatric Hospital

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.

Would you know the signs of depression in a friend or family member?

National Depression Screening Day is October 11

  • National Depression Screening Day  10/11/12
  • Mental Health Awareness Week 10/7/12 – 10/13/12
  • National Day of Prayer for Mental Illness Recovery and Understanding 10/9/12

Would you know the signs of depression in a friend or family member? Symptoms of depression include:

  • Persistent feelings of sadness, anxiety, or emptiness
  • Hopelessness
  • Feeling guilty, worthless, or helpless
  • Loss of interest in hobbies and activities
  • Loss of interest in sex
  • Feeling tired
  • Trouble concentrating, remembering, or making decisions
  • Trouble sleeping, waking up too early, or oversleeping
  • Eating more or less than usual
  • Weight gain or weight loss
  • Thoughts of death or suicide with or without suicide attempts
  • Restlessness or irritability
  • Physical symptoms that defy standard diagnosis and do not respond well to medical treatments

Click here for a free, confidential, on-line depression screening tool

In 1990, the U.S. Congress established the first Mental Illness Awareness Week. Held annually during Mental Illness Awareness Week in October, National Depression Screening Day (NDSD) raises awareness and screens people for depression and related mood and anxiety disorders. More than half a million people each year have been screened for depression since it began.

Less than one-third of adults and less than one-half of children with a diagnosed mental illness receive treatment. National Depression Screening Day raises awareness and screens people for depression and related mood and anxiety disorders. The more people know, the better they can help themselves or help their loved ones get the help and support they need.

For more information about National Depression Screening Day, visit these web sites:

NAMI

NDSD

If you or someone you know would benefit from addiction treatment or mental health services, please contact Aurora Behavioral Health Services at 877-666-7223 or visit our web site at Aurora Behavioral Health Services

What is being done to prevent suicides in the United States?

The 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention was released Monday, September 10th.

The report from the U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Regina Benjamin and the Action Alliance includes 13 goals and 60 objectives for reducing suicides over the next 10 years.

U.S. health officials said nearly 100 people every day commit suicide, and many more attempt it. It is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S. with rates doubling those of lives taken by homicide. The military in particular has seen an alarming increase in suicides this year.

The new guidelines focus on preventing suicides, especially among military veterans, by methods such as beefing up the nation’s crisis hotline to help. Four immediate priorities are highlighted to reduce the number of suicides:

  1. Integrating suicide prevention into health care policies.
  2. Encouraging the transformation of health care systems to prevent suicide.
  3. Changing the way the public talks about suicide and suicide prevention.
  4. Improving the quality of data on suicidal behaviors to develop increasingly effective prevention efforts.

The National Strategy‘s goals and objectives fall within four strategic directions, which, when working together, may most effectively prevent suicides:

  1. Create supportive environments that promote healthy and empowered individuals, families, and communities (4 goals, 16 objectives)
  2. Enhance clinical and community preventive services (3 goals, 12 objectives)
  3. Promote the availability of timely treatment and support services (3 goals, 20 objectives)
  4. Improve suicide prevention surveillance collection, research, and evaluation (3 goals, 12 objectives)

In addition, the federal government announced it will boost staff by 50 percent at the national hotline – 1-800-273-TALK – which is open to military and civilians alike. It provided $55.6 million for state and local programs, and highlighted Facebook features that link distressed users to counselors.

You can view the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention and additional materials at the US Surgeon General web site. To speak to someone about emotional distress or suicidal thoughts, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Visit these web sites for more information:

suicide risk factors

suicide warning signs

For more information about treatment for individuals experiencing anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, or thoughts of suicide visit the web site for Aurora Psychiatric Hospital

Aurora Behavioral Health Services offers complete mental health treatment options, provided by highly trained professionals in a caring, confidential manner to meet individual and family needs.  If you or someone you know needs help, contact us — online or by phone at 1-877-666-7223 — as soon as possible.